Jers Novel Writer – PowerPC

My Facebook friend Gregory will be very happy because I finally got some time to check  out the application that he mentioned on Mac PowerPC’s Facebook Page a long time ago, which I had bookmarked but never had enough time to get to.  Here you go!

* Jers Novel Writer 1.1.12 – (Demo $30.00) – http://jerssoftwarehut.com/jers-novel-writer/download-jers-novel-writer  – PowerPC friendly Panther / Tiger / Leopard – 10.3/10.4/10.5 – It’s a simple but not restricted writing application.  I’m very impressed with the quality of this word processor, as it has everything to keeping you writing and saving your ideas without messing things up.  It has a main window like any other word processor but the coolest feature is that it has a tab running along the side that allows you see all your other saved projects!  It also has a notes tab that allows you to post all your brainstormed ideas and subjects that keep you on track as you write.  In my opinion, this is great software that totally deserves to be installed on your machine.    Attention Writers:  Now it’s time to make your Mac buddy work a little bit harder.

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3 comments on “Jers Novel Writer – PowerPC

  1. The Jers application is one of a group of non-linear word processors that can be used on a G4 with 10.4. These range from the distinctly basic Z-Write (http://www.stonetablesoftware.com/z-write/index.html) to the industrial strength Scrivener (http://www.literatureandlatte.com/download_mac.php). To put it in context, Z-write first appeared on old world macs and is in retirement, but was a good editorial workhorse for all that. (I stayed in 8.6 years after 10.4 was available) Just bear in mind that like most other carbonised applications, Z-write won’t know about UTF font architecture when you come to export text with accented letters, smart quotes and the like. (A bit like AppleWorks in that respect.)
    The more recent Scrivener is still in development and 2.3 runs on my G4. It allows me to import collections of files, split the editing window, then view and play back QuickTime movies, multimedia content, PDFs, web pages: the list is a long one. Any files that it cannot import are aliased, so that you can re-open the original with whatever application you would normally use.
    Before I started using Scrivener for all my work, there was a time when I tried working with Ulysses version 1, but found the text-only output a problem, since I needed RTF export. This became available in Ulysses version 2, from memory, which was beyond the reach of my machine’s spec. Ulysses is now in version 3 and looks like a powerful option for Intel users (version 1 was really well documented and a solid piece of work).
    The best thing about Scrivener is that it backs up your work as you go, so even if your Mac crashes, it is not the end of the world for your written output. The programme will handle huge quantities of project data. However, depending on your bus speed and processing power, you may want to limit file sizes to a few hundred megabytes. The reason being that Scrivener backs up to an array of zip archives every time you close a project file.

  2. It isn’t truly a Demo or Shareware, but rather Nagware. Jer’s will continue to function like the paid version even if you never pay for the software. Once you click through the Nagware screen, which pops up every time you open it, you’re good to go.

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